Although Czech television (Česká televize) was one of the sponsors of the documentary, he repeatedly delayed the broadcast, claiming that the documentary was «unbalanced» and marked by «pro-Serbian bias,» and thus «the tone of the documentary could cause negative emotions.»[1] Václav Dvořák, the director, responded that the same was appropriate for «Holocaust documentaries, where the page and point of view of Nazi Germany are also ignored» [1] Stolen Kosovo (Czech: Uloupené Kosovo, Serbian: Украдено Косово, Ukradeno Kosovo) is a 2008 Czech documentary by director Václav Dvořák (* 1948) about events during and after the Kosovo War. The documentary describes the situation in Kosovo, first in a brief overview of the history of the region, followed by the conflicts of the 1990s and the bombing of Serbia by NATO forces in 1999 and ending with the situation after the Kosovo war. The documentary focuses on the 1990s during the reign of Slobodan Milošević, as well as numerous interviews with Albanian separatists and Serbian civilians. In 2012, Karen Stokkendal Poulsen, Danish director, was granted unique access to the European Union`s diplomatic talks between Serbia and Kosovo. Robert Cooper – a former high-level EU diplomat and chief negotiator – led these negotiations, and the «Fly on the Wall» documentation, while offering insight into the difficulties of getting two pages to talk. The first broadcast, which will take place on 17 March 2008, on 4 The anniversary of the ethnic clashes in Kosovo in 2004, was postponed to April and was finally broadcast by a follow-up programme that analysed the Kosovo conflict from the point of view of the Kosovo Albanians. The creators of the documentary published it on YouTube, where it is still available (June 2015). Documentary producer Aleš Bednář also said that it was not excluded that some viewers would feel «unbalanced», but only because they have been «unilaterally informed about the Conflicts in the Balkans for years, notably by television, but also by other media». [2] A piece of world history is written when Serbia and Kosovo first meet at the office of Robert Cooper, the EU`s chief negotiator, to reach an agreement on peaceful coexistence. . . .

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